Arts Grads – Profiles of Success & Resilience – November

“Leave people 5% better than you found them” Arts Grad: Róisín Reilly Course:  MA – English Literature, Film & Television, English Language (Graduated 2010) Current Job: Communications and Engagement Lead, World Changing Glasgow, University of Glasgow   ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Undergraduate In 2006, Róisín arrived at the University of Glasgow to start her studies and have her world changed with an English Literature degree. In 2018, she […]

Religious Dress in the Flesh

Exploring Religious Clothing through Interfaith Encounter A partnership event between Interfaith Glasgow, the University of Glasgow and St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art Funded by the University of Glasgow Chancellor’s Fund and the College of Arts. 26 August 2018 On a Sunday afternoon in August, 35 people from diverse religious and non-religious backgrounds […]

Arts Grads: Profiles of Success & Resilience – October

“Tiny, but mighty” Arts Grad: Anna-Maria N. Hand Course: MLitt – Art History: Dress & Textile Histories (Graduated 2014) Current Job:  Gallery Director & Collections Manager, Southern Vermont Art Centre Undergraduate Challenges A Gallery Director & Collections Manager before the age of 30, Anna-Maria N. Hand had a passion for historic fashion from the start. “I was the only little kid dressed up for Halloween like […]

Human "books" ready for loan at the Human Book Project. Books with people's names lie on a library trolley.

Sharing our career stories: advice from alumni at the Human Book Project

MSc student Mallory O’Donoghue took part in the Human Book Project at the University of Glasgow Library to get some career advice from senior research fellow, ex-deputy director of the Victoria and Albert Museum and University of Glasgow graduate Beth McKillop. From green freshers to seasoned postgraduate students, by the middle of the semester it’s […]

Audience members standing on the stairs watching the closing performance of OINK TRAP under hangings created during the residency

History of Art building hosts artist residency

CRACK SQUAD OF SITU was a week-long takeover of the History of Art building at 8 University Gardens by MLitt Curatorial Practice (Contemporary Art) student Holly Knox Yeoman and artist Fritz Welch. Combining installation, wall drawings and video, the residency culminated in the performance of OINK TRAP – a graphic score of live experimental music, […]

What successful Glasgow graduates believe you need to know

A postgraduate programme of study is a huge step up from an undergraduate degree. You’ll need to be prepared to work harder, dig deeper and stay motivated- all on your own. But most likely you know all this already. But what about the stuff you don’t know (yet)? The stuff you learn through trial and error? What do those who’ve been there and come successfully out the other side say?

What’s the one piece of advice successful University of Glasgow Arts graduates would give to incoming students? Read more about What successful Glasgow graduates believe you need to know

Reach 08: Situating barkcloth production in time and place

A’ Suidheachadh Dèanamh Clò-Rùisg a’ Chuain Shèimh ann an Tìm is Àite

Barkcloth
Misa Tamura (centre) Research Conservator, displaying barkcloth at a Centre for Textile Conservation and Technical Arts History open dat, 18th March 2016. Photo by Sarah Foskett.

Barkcloth has been used to make clothing, furnishings, garments and ritual masks in the tropical islands of the Pacific, such as Samoa, the Cook Islands and Hawaii for around 5000 years. It was made by beating the raw tree bark until it became a soft, tactile, non-woven textile. Although Western styles and fashions are now more common in the Pacific, the material is still used across the region as an expression of cultural identity. Yet very little is known about the material itself, and about how best to display, store and preserve barkcloth collections.

Frances Lennard, a Senior Lecturer in Textile Conservation, is leading a new AHRC funded project to study bark cloth as an art form. Lennard’s team includes Misa Tamura, a specialist in the conservation of ethnographic collections, material scientist Dr Margaret Smith who is studying the material properties of the cloth, and art historian Dr Andrew Mills who will be placing the artefacts in their historical context. The broader aim of the project is to ‘find out whether materials, techniques and designs originated from particular islands, how they were transmitted around the region and the effect of globalisation on this tradition.’ Cutting edge techniques will also be used to try and identify which plants were used to make the barkcloth, including protein and DNA analysis and isotope analysis. Read more about Reach 08: Situating barkcloth production in time and place

Reach 08: Learning Polish is as easy as 1+2

Ionnsachadh na Pòlainnis cho furasta ri 1+2 There are currently over 15,000 Polish speaking children in Scottish schools. According to the Scottish government’s new education policy primary school children will now be taught two foreign languages as part of the ‘1+2’ scheme. The policy stipulates that children will be taught in their native tongue (1) […]