In/Human: The Body as Resource – A’ Bhodhaig mar Ghoireas

In/Human: The Body as Resource was a one-day event held in the newly opened Kelvin Hall on March 11th 2017. The event was the result of a collaboration between four students on the Curatorial Practice (Contemporary Art) Masters programme and The Hunterian. Lesley Young, a lecturer in History of Art at the University of Glasgow noted that […]

SERF: The Strathearn Environs and Royal Forteviot Project -Àrainneachdan Srath Èireann & Pròiseact Rìoghail Fhothair Tabhaicht‌

The Strathearn Environs and Royal Forteviot project, or SERF, began in 2006 when three archaeologists decided to pursue their overlapping research interests in this landscape in Perthshire. Professor Steve Driscoll, Dr Kenny Brophy and Gordon Noble, who was a post-doctoral fellow at the time, were fascinated by the landscape of Strathearn and its archaeological significance […]

Reflecting on Shestov: Designing a retrospective exhibition of the philosopher’s life

A’ Beachdachadh air Shestov: A’ Dealbhachadh taisbeanadh Ath-shùileach air beatha an fheallsanaiche In 1886 Lev Shestov was born into a Jewish family in Kiev, in what was then known as Russia. He later emigrated to France in 1921 following the October Revolution. It was during his years in Paris that Shestov established himself as a […]

Unearthing Iona: Developing an Archaeological Research Framework for Iona

‌A’ Cladhach an Eilean Ì: A’ Leasachadh Frèam-obrach Rannsachadh Arc-eòla The tranquil Isle of Iona, nestled amongst the Inner Hebrides, has drawn visitors in search of its natural beauty and on pilgrimage for generations. At one point, the island was perhaps the most significant place in all of medieval Scotland. Founded by Saint Columba in […]

Origins of Art: The Provenance Project

Reach 09 – Origins of Art: The Provenance Project ‌Tùs Ealain : Pròiseact Tùsachd Have you ever found yourself standing before a beautiful work of Chinese art, admiring its colours, tones and textures, with your feet are firmly planted in the UK? If you’ve visited the Burrell Collection, the National Museum of Scotland, or the […]

Reach 08: Situating barkcloth production in time and place

A’ Suidheachadh Dèanamh Clò-Rùisg a’ Chuain Shèimh ann an Tìm is Àite

Barkcloth
Misa Tamura (centre) Research Conservator, displaying barkcloth at a Centre for Textile Conservation and Technical Arts History open dat, 18th March 2016. Photo by Sarah Foskett.

Barkcloth has been used to make clothing, furnishings, garments and ritual masks in the tropical islands of the Pacific, such as Samoa, the Cook Islands and Hawaii for around 5000 years. It was made by beating the raw tree bark until it became a soft, tactile, non-woven textile. Although Western styles and fashions are now more common in the Pacific, the material is still used across the region as an expression of cultural identity. Yet very little is known about the material itself, and about how best to display, store and preserve barkcloth collections.

Frances Lennard, a Senior Lecturer in Textile Conservation, is leading a new AHRC funded project to study bark cloth as an art form. Lennard’s team includes Misa Tamura, a specialist in the conservation of ethnographic collections, material scientist Dr Margaret Smith who is studying the material properties of the cloth, and art historian Dr Andrew Mills who will be placing the artefacts in their historical context. The broader aim of the project is to ‘find out whether materials, techniques and designs originated from particular islands, how they were transmitted around the region and the effect of globalisation on this tradition.’ Cutting edge techniques will also be used to try and identify which plants were used to make the barkcloth, including protein and DNA analysis and isotope analysis. Read more about Reach 08: Situating barkcloth production in time and place

Dress & Textiles: Find your perfect fit

It is easy to find patterns in the work we do about Dress and Textiles in the College of Arts. Our research is innovative and exciting; it is colourful and richly textured both literally and metaphorically. We look through archives to uncover the history of dress design and textile manufacturing. We also do more technical […]

New discoveries, new connections: Digital Innovations event.

  by Jennifer Hilder (PhD Intern) Before Christmas, around fifty people attended the ‘Digital Innovation in the Public Sector’ event, held at Glasgow University and organised by the College of Arts’ ArtsLab and Knowledge Exchange teams. The afternoon was split into two halves, with speakers from different sectors of Glasgow Life guiding us through their […]